Streetlight LED Conversion Project

LED STREET LIGHT CONVERSION PROJECT

Project Overview:

The city of Pittsfield converted 5,372 streetlights to LED in 2019. The conversion included 4,854 “cobrahead” lights and 518 “decorative” lights.

The conversion took approximately 6 months with a total cost of $2,232,270. The city received $615,258 in incentives from Eversource and MAPC and the remaining $1,617,012 was funded under capital improvement budget.

The annual operating costs of streetlights before converting to LED was $540,280. The annual operating cost savings after converting to LED is $291,751, equivalent to 54% in savings. The payback period for the purchase and installation of the LEDs will be 5.2 years while the life expectancy of the new LED lights is 23 years.

LED Lighting Schedule

Fixture ID

Watts

Map #

Quantity

19W_ATBS-A-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

19W

1

1607

24W_ATBS-B-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

24W

2

859

24W_ATBS-B-MVOLT-R3-27K-MP-NL-P7

24W

3

186

40W_ATBS-E-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

40W

5

1202

60W_ATBS-H-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

60W

11

586

70W_ATBM-B-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

70W

13

115

95W_ATBM-D-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

95W

14

254

150W_ATBM-G-MVOLT-R2-27K-MP-NL-P7

150W

16

45

24W_CSL-P-1M-3K-T3-7P-TBK-TA

24W

4

173

44W_CSL-P-2M-3K-T3-7P-TBK-TA

44W

9

133

44W_CSL-P-2M-3K-T5-7P-TBK-TA

44W

10

35

40W_K136R-B3-AR-IV-40(SSL)1036-120V-K14-P7-3K-BK-#1

40W

6

49

40W_K136R-B3-AR-V-40(SSL)1036-120V-K14-P7-3K-BK-#1

40W

7

31

60W_K136R-B3-AR-V-60(SSL)1036-120V-K14-P7-3K-BK-#1

60W

12

50

40W_K808-P4SH-II-40 SSL-8060-120-KPL10-PEBC-3K-BK-WS

40W

8

4

110W_LFS-SFL-110-DB-ST-C-1-WW-Y-7P-X

110W

15

43

Grand Total

 

 

5372

 

LED Conversion project Map:

Link: Interactive Map

Web address: https://realtermenergy.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/3ebfc136601d4d8884491cdbe46ce634

Frequently Asked Questions:

  1. What is the entire scope of the conversion program?
  2. How will this conversion effect the city's energy use and budget for streetlights?
  3. What other benefits are there in an LED conversion?
  4. What is an LED?
  5. What type of streetlights did the LED streetlights replace?
  6. What does color temperature mean?
  7. Hasn't the American Medical Association (AMA) raised health concerns about LED streetlights?
  8. Shouldn't the new LED streetlights be shielded so that drivers cannot see the source light?
  9. Will new LED streetlights produce unwanted spill light?
  10. How do I report an LED outage or request a house shield?
  11. How did the City determine streetlight wattages and brightness levels?
  12. Did the City consider a wireless control system that would allow dimming of the streetlights?
  13. Have the LED streetlights resulted in higher levels of blue light?
  14. What other Massachusetts municipalities have converted streetlights to LED?

1.The City has converted 4,854 city-owned “cobrahead” and 475 “decorative” streetlights along City streets and 43 floodlights on parking lots and select city building exteriors to LEDs.

2.The LED streetlight upgrade will result in a 54% reduction in energy use when compared to current technology and lower the city’s electric bill by about $290,000 per year. These savings, along with a $615,258 rebate from Eversource and MAPC, means this project will pay for itself within 5.2 years. As a reference, the 185,000 kWh per year energy savings are enough to power 930 average Massachusetts homes.

  • 3.LEDs last far longer than existing High Pressure Sodium (HPS) streetlights. The new LED fixtures are rated to maintain at least 70% of their light output for 100,000 hours, which is about 23 years with 12 Hour usage average.
  • The LED fixtures will reduce light pollution and lower the amount of trespass light shining onto yards and into houses.
  • Unlike the majority of the city’s old streetlights, the LED lights shine almost no light above 80 degrees up from vertical and zero light above 90 degrees up from vertical.
  • The new LED streetlights produce 50% less light then the current HPS streetlights. However, they will look as bright as the old fixtures because the light they produce is more useful to the human eye.
  • While the old streetlights produced light shining it in a 360-degree circle around the light, the new LED fixtures shine light predominately up and down the street, greatly reducing the amount of light trespass into yards and windows.
  • Because they use less energy, LEDs also help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Emissions will be reduced by approximately 130 metric tons of CO2 per year.
  • Light from the LED streetlights make colors look brighter and more “true” to natural color. Trees look green instead of brown, a blue car looks blue instead of grey. Due to this improved color rendition, things appear brighter and sharper under LEDs, which is why police and other safety personnel prefer LEDs.

 

4.A light-emitting diode (LED) is a semiconductor light source that emits light when current flows through it.

5.The vast majority of the streetlights in Pittsfield were High Pressure Sodium (HPS) cobrahead fixtures and a few were Mercury-Vapor (MV) lamps.

6.Color temperature of lighting is measured in Kelvin (K) units. Lower temperatures are “warmer” and yellower; higher temperatures are “cooler” and bluer. High-pressure sodium (HPS) streetlights have a color temperature of approximately 2200K. LED streetlights have color temperatures ranging from 3000K or lower (warm yellow) to 6000K (day white). The LED streetlights that have been installed have a color temperature of 2,700K.

7.In June 2016, the American Medical Association (AMA) issued guidance for communities on selecting among LED lighting options to minimize potential harmful human and environmental effects. The streetlights installed by the City of Pittsfield meet or exceed the AMA's recommendations.

8.No, the new lights, which have been certified by the International Dark Sky Association to be a fully-shielded, full-cutoff fixture, are designed to provide a smooth transition from the brightest area of light directly under a lamp to the dimmest area between lamps. Adding extra shielding to prevent light from shining up and down the street would result in sharp transitions from bright areas to dark areas along the road. This would inhibit drivers and pedestrians located under the streetlight from clearly seeing cars and people located in the darker areas of the road. The source of light in an LED streetlight is directed downward enough to avoid causing drivers from experiencing disability glare from the light.

9.No, the new lights reduce unwanted spill light into homes and properties as most of the light is directed up and down the street. However, if a homeowner reports that there is light coming directly into their home from the new LEDs, the homeowner can request that the city evaluate the light to see if it fits the criteria to have a shield installed on the streetlight to control the unwanted light.

10.You can submit a request via PittSMART app on a smartphone or on your computer via the city’s website at https://www.cityofpittsfield.org/report/index.php.

The city will evaluate all requests for shields to determine if the streetlight’s position in relation to the house will result in more than 0.009 foot-candles of illumination from the streetlight reaching the house. If the city determines that this may be possible, it will have a shield installed on that lamp to block the lamp’s illumination from the house.

11.This project largely follows replacing HPS streetlights with LED streetlights that have the same perceived level of brightness as the old lights. Residential streets have the lowest wattage ranging from 19Watts to 24Watts, while arterial and connector streets have the highest wattage ranging from 40Watts to 150Watts.

12.Yes but dimming controls were not included in the project. The current cost of wireless controls added 17% to the overall project cost. However, many of the streetlights were installed at a dimmer, lower-power setting resulting in the city producing less greenhouse emissions. The light fixtures installed are compatible with smart control devices making it possible to install in the future without replacing the LED work done to date.

13.Possibly, but minimally at the most. It is more likely that the new LED lights have reduced the amount of blue light produced by the City’s streetlights. This is because, while the light from 2,700K LED lamps contains a higher percentage of blue light than found in the light from HPS lamps, the LED fixtures will produce far less light (more than 50% less) than the HPS fixtures. Remember, the light from LED lamps is far more useful to the human eye, so less light is needed to provide visual clarity and the city is reducing perceived light levels in several parts of the city.

14.This is not a complete list as more cities are making the conversion every month:

Amherst, Chelsea, Natick, Weston, Arlington, Dartmouth, New Bedford, Westwood, Bedford, Fairhaven, Newton, Winchester, Boston, Fitchburg, Randolph, Winthrop, Brookline, Greenfield, Salem, Woburn, Cambridge, Hamilton, Sharon, Cape Cod (20 towns), Haverhill, Shirley, Chelmsford, Holyoke, Watertown.